German airlines – Windge Fluester http://windgefluester.net/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 23:30:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://windgefluester.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png German airlines – Windge Fluester http://windgefluester.net/ 32 32 What will happen to NASA’s SOFIA Boeing 747 now? https://windgefluester.net/what-will-happen-to-nasas-sofia-boeing-747-now/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/what-will-happen-to-nasas-sofia-boeing-747-now/ Between Wednesday evening and Thursday morning, NASA operated the final flight of the Boeing 747-SP carrying a reflecting telescope for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This flight marked the end of an era, and now there is the question of what will become of this iconic aircraft. Simple Flying spoke with Paul Hertz, […]]]>

Between Wednesday evening and Thursday morning, NASA operated the final flight of the Boeing 747-SP carrying a reflecting telescope for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This flight marked the end of an era, and now there is the question of what will become of this iconic aircraft. Simple Flying spoke with Paul Hertz, Senior Advisor to NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, former Director of the Astrophysics Division and former SOFIA Program Scientist. That’s what he told us.


What future for SOFIA?

In 1997, NASA acquired a Boeing 747SP, which had previously flown commercially with Pan Am (1977-1986) and United Airlines (1986-1997). Then NASA and the German Space Agency heavily modified the aircraft, allowing it to carry a 2.7-meter, 20-ton telescope to observe the infrared universe carrying a unique scientific mission.

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SOFIA operated between 2010 and 2022, reaching full capacity in 2014. It quickly became an avgeek favorite, drawing a crowd wherever it went, because that’s what happens with one-of-a-kind aircraft (we’ve seen the same with the Antonov An-225 or one of the Airbus Belugas, for example).

According to Paul Hertz, now that SOFIA has reached the end of its active history, NASA must follow a standard process established by the US government for disposal of equipment that is no longer needed.

What will happen with this iconic Boeing 747SP? Photo: NASA.

Museum or other American agency?

The Government Services Administration (GSA, the agency that manages federal properties and provides contracting options for other agencies) has already issued a call to all organizations interested in flying. Other government agencies are getting early notices, Hertz added.

“We don’t anticipate there being any other government agencies (interested in the aircraft) and then it will come online in the private sector. We anticipate that one or more aviation museums will express interest. Once we have all of these expressions of interest, a standard process is followed to decide how we are going to lay out the observatory. »

SOFIA wouldn’t be the only artifact to end up in a museum. Hertz added that NASA anticipates that other artifacts from the program that are already being disposed of could end up in multiple museums.

Now the question is, which museum could the 747 be sent to? Would it be the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, Space Center Houston, the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, or perhaps one across the United States? We will have to wait and see.

SOFIA could end up in a museum. Photo: NASA

What did SOFIA do?

The SOFIA mission has helped scientists observe the infrared universe and monitor events such as the formation of new stars and solar systems. As Paul Hertz explained, SOFIA has given scientists some of the best insights into star forming regions. He also showed us how matter accumulates to form brand new stars and the role of magnetic fields in these processes.

SOFIA has also observed water on the moon’s lighted side, an exciting discovery that will be confirmed when humans return to the Moon. Finally, SOFIA provided maps of some active galaxies containing supermassive black holes.

“SOFIA was a very successful mission. It has operated in scientific mode, with full operational capabilities, for over eight years and has generated significant scientific results. SOFIA is a wonderful achievement by a huge team of people. First, the engineers who figured out how to put a 20-ton telescope on a Boeing 747, how to create an opening so we could peer through the universe, and how to make sure that when we were flying hundreds of miles at the time, the air flowing over the opening was so smooth, allowing us to get some fabulous astronomical images.

In which museum would you like to see SOFIA end up? Would you give the iconic plane another purpose? Let us know in the comments below.

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Solomun, the DJ who makes Ibiza dance https://windgefluester.net/solomun-the-dj-who-makes-ibiza-dance/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 10:01:21 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/solomun-the-dj-who-makes-ibiza-dance/ Contents This content can also be viewed on the site from which it originated. Midsummer in Ibiza, ten minutes to midnight. Around a long table in the filtered garden of Can Domingo, a restaurant in the southern hills, two dozen people picked up the remains of a generous dinner: ravioli, veal milanaise, caponata. Gerd Janson, […]]]>

Contents

This content can also be viewed on the site from which it originated.

Midsummer in Ibiza, ten minutes to midnight. Around a long table in the filtered garden of Can Domingo, a restaurant in the southern hills, two dozen people picked up the remains of a generous dinner: ravioli, veal milanaise, caponata. Gerd Janson, a forty-five-year-old German DJ with courteous manners, asked me if I wanted some more fish. He was dressed like one of the Royal Tenenbaums, with a scarf and a white campanile shirt tucked into chinos. I was satisfied, but he insisted. “The fish is so delicious, and it’s a long night, he reminded me.

In the center of the table was another DJ, Mladen Solomun, the reason for the long night and many more. Solomun is a forty-six-year-old German-Bosno-Croatian from Hamburg who looks like a Visigoth leader or retired linebacker: six feet tall and plump, with a graying beard and long black hair that it often wears pulled back. He is known to millions of ravers only by his last name and to an intimate circle only by his first name. At Can Domingo, he was Mladen, gentle and attentive with the Chablis. After dinner, it would become Solomun, a master key for the enjoyment of thousands of people.

This summer, several people described Solomun to me as the “king of Ibiza”. He professes to hate this appellation, but it has merit. Since 2013, with the exception of covid break, he played at Pacha, the oldest nightclub on the island, at least twenty Sundays a year. (Parties start at midnight and continue until dawn Monday.) His residence, called Solomun+1, dominates the scene so much that other clubs plan their schedules around it. Spotlight on Ibizaa nightlife guide, recently called Solomun+1 the “center of the universe”.

At Can Domingo, Solomun turned to Janson, smiled and said, in heavily accented English, “Hey, it’s almost noon, why aren’t you at Pacha?” Other clubs on the island hire multiple DJs for a single night, and in larger venues, DJs play in different rooms simultaneously. With more names on the poster, clubbers are more likely to spot someone they like. Pasha has one main piece, and Solomun prefers a simple formula. He believes that dancers yearn to be taken on a musical journey and the way to take them is to create a long and involving set. When Solomun plays, he only invites one other DJ, his “+1” – tonight that would be Janson. Guest plays from midnight to 2:30 a.m. a mSolomun plays from 2:30 a.m. a m up to 5 a mthen the duo play together, or “back to back”, for the last two hours, ending at 7 a m.

Janson was aware that midnight was approaching, but he was not one to fuss. Indeed, he had chatted pleasantly with Solomun about the madness of their schedules. The next day, Janson would take three roundabout flights to Corsica, for a concert that evening. “I am a working class kid,” he said. “I have to work.”

At midnight, a Pasha employee chased Janson away in a van. The other guests were in no hurry: Paul Bor, Solomun’s tour manager, who is almost always at his side; a famous German actor; a London currency trader, who met Solomun at a health retreat; a Croatian technician who lives in Los Angeles Solomun usually doesn’t get to Pacha for about 2 a m. When the check arrived, Solomun paid and everyone went back to their villa to shower and change before the night – or the morning – started in earnest.

Ninety minutes after leaving Can Domingo, Solomun arrived at Pacha in a cool black t-shirt, black pants with a white stripe down the side, Air Jordans and a Yankees cap. He was carrying USB sticks, containing tens of thousands of tracks, in a pink Aristocats handbag he had spotted in an Ibiza supermarket earlier this summer. Solomun started DJing in the age of vinyl, when DJs carried boxes of records to their events. He told me he was still, at heart, an “analog guy” – he hated that clubbers were recording videos on cellphones rather than immersing themselves in the experience. But he acknowledged that the digital age had been good for his lower back.

Solomun, a practicing Catholic, has a devout fan base. One of his devotees said: “The function of the DJ is to preside over the ceremony. He is the priest or the shaman.

Pasha is in a casa paysa—a traditional farmhouse—and its layout is quirky. Reaching the DJ booth from the street feels like a psychedelic recreation of the Steadicam shot in “GoodFellas”: After passing a security guard, you enter a garden filled with sculptures of unicorns, giraffes and naked women, then follow a winding hallway, lined with red lights, leads you past a bustling kitchen and mixed-gender bathrooms into the main club room, where you walk through the VIP area and, finally, down a short flight of stairs. The volume is engulfing. Mesmerizing hexagonal light panels move up and down the dance floor in response to the music, making the club feel like a living organism. The British designers who created the exhibition, Helen Swan and Chris Carr, were inspired by Émile Durkheim’s 1912 book, “Elementary Forms of Religious Life”, which describes “collective effervescence” – in which individuals become a group by communicating only through action.

The booth is about thirty feet wide and has its own little bar for the DJ and his friends. Two club employees guard the entrance, and no amount of money or fame guarantees admission. You can’t press the DJ music, or get too close or too drunk. Bor, the tour manager, oversees what he calls “booth policy,” and any violation of the unwritten code can result in expulsion. The truly chosen are invited to take an occasional shot of tequila with Solomun. His rider’s mark is Clase Azul Reposado, which the club brings especially for him. Solomun sometimes drinks more than thirty shots of tequila in one night on the turntables, with no visible change in his sobriety.

By the time Solomun arrived, Janson was at the top of his set. It bustled about on the four decks in front of it: they were fitted with circular jog wheels, for navigating a particular track; sliders, to adjust tempo and volume; and a set of dials and buttons that perform various functions, from eight-bar loops to drum rolls. The Pacha, which can hold more than three thousand people, was at the limit of its capacity. In front of the stand, general admission clubbers, most of whom had paid seventy euros a ticket, were bouncing. Behind Janson was the VIP area, where securing the best table – close to the DJ but with space to dance – can cost twenty thousand euros.

Solomun and Janson hugged, and Janson quickly took control. Dj’ing requires concentration. It’s not just about selecting tracks, but also putting them together in time and in a nice key. Additionally, modern turntables essentially allow a DJ to remix tracks while playing them, and clubbers now expect improvised magic in a set. Over the next hour, several other top DJs joined Solomun and Janson in the booth, including three Germans – Adam Port, &ME and Rampa – known collectively as Keinemusik. They produce and play silky, melodic house, and this summer they were the hottest thing in dance music. (&ME and Rampa produced two tracks on Drake’s latest album, “Honestly, Nevermind.”) They also frequently collaborate with Solomun on remixes. The trio had just arrived from New York and headlined the following night at DC10, an influential club near the airport. They all looked exhausted, but, like midshipmen in a medieval court, they had come to pay their respects to the Pasha.

At 2:30 a.m. a m., Janson was playing his final track, a buzzing remix of the 1984 Belgian disco number “Love Games.” Solomun spotted his first track – “Dos Blokes,” by Spanish producer Orion Agassi – then listened to it on his headphones to make sure his beat matched the outgoing beat. Many ravers near the bridges had pupils like bath plugs, and they ecstatically greeted Solomun’s approach. The rolling hook of “Dos Blokes” spilled into the club. Like almost everyone present, I raised my hand. As I did, I dropped my notebook, then spent an uncomfortable minute crawling among dancing feet to retrieve it. Solomun gave a thin smile but barely recognized the clamor. He was at work.

Ibiza, a beautiful Spanish island in the Mediterranean, is forested with pine trees and lined with spectacular coves. When Phoenician merchants first arrived, in the 7th century BC, they named the island ‘ybsm, after Bes, the Egyptian god associated with music, dance and sex. ‘ybsm became Ibiza. For the past few decades it has been a destination for transgressive intruders: beatniks, jazz lovers, artists, refugees, hippies, celebrities, yogis, ravers. Walter Benjamin, who stayed in Ibiza in the 1930s, noticed the inscription on the sundial of the cathedral: “Ultima Multisor “The last day for many”. The sundial has since disintegrated, but its message could serve as a creed for a hedonist: Seize the night.

Clubs began drawing people to the island, which is about twice the size of Martha’s Vineyard, in the mid-20th century. According to ‘Dope in the Age of Innocence’, Irish émigré Damien Enright’s gripping memoir of Ibiza’s counterculture era, jazz was the hot sound then. In 1961, wrote Enright, the island’s nightlife was fueled by benzedrine and booze, and centered on a bar named Domino, from which flowed “the craziest, freest, most innovative music that most of us have ever heard”.

In 1966 two brothers, Ricardo and Piti Urgell, started a nightclub called Pacha outside Barcelona. The name was suggested by Ricardo’s wife, who predicted that the club’s profits would allow him to “live like a pasha”. (Not so long ago, the Urgells sold the Pacha Group to private equity for three hundred and fifty million euros.) In 1973, the brothers opened an outpost in Ibiza, and it became a melting pot where hippies hung out with movie and pop directors. the stars danced with the fishermen.

At the time, the dominant music was disco, which was played largely using conventional instruments. Tracing the genesis of modern dance music, with its electronic rhythms and sounds, is like trying to find the center of a cloud, but most enthusiasts agree on certain milestones: Roland drum machines, loft parts of David Mancuso in Manhattan, Kraftwerk. In the early ’80s, a group of black Chicago DJs steeped in disco, R.&B., and synth-pop began playing locally produced dance music at parties. The Chicago sound had a strong 4/4 beat, a bit of a bounce and often soulful vocals, and it typically pulsed at around one hundred and twenty beats per minute. It was house music. An electronic music scene also developed in Detroit, with harder, sparser tracks that often lacked vocals. It was techno.

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Delta dreams of summer 2023 with more new routes to Europe https://windgefluester.net/delta-dreams-of-summer-2023-with-more-new-routes-to-europe/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 15:11:54 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/delta-dreams-of-summer-2023-with-more-new-routes-to-europe/ This article contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to these products. The content of this page is accurate as of the date of publication; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. For more information, see our Advertising Disclosure. Summer […]]]>
This article contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to these products. The content of this page is accurate as of the date of publication; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. For more information, see our Advertising Disclosure.

Summer is right behind us, but Delta is already gearing up for summer 2023 with nearly 10 more routes across the pond in the works.

The Atlanta-based airline on Friday unveiled its plans for next summer, taking 2022’s major rebound for transatlantic travel and kicking it up a notch. It includes a mix of resumptions of pre-pandemic routes, new stops in Germany and Switzerland, the relaunch of nonstop flights from Los Angeles (LAX) to Europe and the addition of even more flights to and from its critical gateway in New York (JFK).

In total, Delta said it would fly 8% more seats over the Atlantic Ocean than last summer.

“Next summer, Delta will offer customers expanded access to popular destinations across the Atlantic, continuing to solidify its position as the number one carrier in New York City,” said Delta’s senior vice president of network planning. Delta, Joe Esposito, in a statement.

All of these new routes are expected to go on sale over the weekend. Here’s a look at the European destinations, new and old, that Delta will fly next year.

LAX is making a comeback

Delta’s transatlantic flights from its West Coast hub in Los Angeles were one of the first casualties of the pandemic. Even though international travel has rebounded this year, these nonstop Delta flights were nowhere to be found.

That will change next year as the airline operates two transatlantic routes from Los Angeles starting in the spring:

  • Los Angeles (LAX) to London Heathrow (LHR) from March 25, 2023
  • Los Angeles (LAX) at Paris-Charles de Gaulle (CDG) from May 8, 2023

Both flights will be operated daily on Delta’s flashy Airbus A330-900neo, equipped with Delta One Suites at the front of the aircraft, Delta Premium Select seats, Delta Comfort Plus for extra legroom and even a spacious 2-4-2 configuration in economy class. From nose to tail, this is one of the best Delta jets for crossing the Atlantic.

delta a suite a330900
Photo courtesy of Delta

Delta hasn’t flown from Los Angeles to Paris since the start of 2020, when almost all international flights arrived at a strident flight. Air France flies nonstop between Los Angeles and Paris, with up to four departures per day in summer 2023. Delta will add a fifth option for SkyTeam travelers.

But it’s been even longer since Angelenos had a nonstop Delta flight to London – Delta hasn’t operated that flight since 2015. Partner airline Virgin Atlantic and British Airways have been a mainstay on the route, however.

Travelers with Delta Sky Club access heading to Europe are in for a treat: the new Los Angeles Sky Club is truly huge and wonderful, to boot.

New and old routes from New York

Delta quickly made New York City (JFK) the cornerstone of its flights to and from Europe. That’s only going to increase in 2023, with Delta poised to achieve its biggest summer of transatlantic flights from New York yet.

That’s thanks to service at a brand new airport in the UK, a route to Switzerland that hasn’t flown in almost two decades making a return, return service to the German capital and another daily flight from summer to one of Europe’s most popular destinations.

  • New York to Geneva (GVA) in Switzerland scheduled to begin daily flights on April 10
  • New York to London-Gatwick (LGW) will also begin daily flights on April 10
  • New York to Berlin (BER) resumes with daily service on May 25
  • New York to Rome (FCO) will get a third daily departure over the summer

Roma, Italy

Delta is no stranger to London with two daily non-stop services between New York and London-Heathrow (LHR) – and half a dozen more with close partner airline Virgin Atlantic. But Gatwick, located 90 minutes south of the city, is a new addition for Delta departing from New York. British Airways and JetBlue already serve the same route to Gatwick.

Geneva, meanwhile, is a blast from the past. While nonstop flights to Zurich (ZRH) have been around for ages, Delta hasn’t flown to Switzerland’s second-largest city since 1993.

Unfortunately, most of these new additions departing from New York are expected to fly on a Boeing 767-300, some of the oldest (and most outdated) jets in Delta’s fleet. The exception is the route to Geneva, which will fly a refurbished Delta 767-400.

It won’t be open in time for next summer, but Delta has something new in store for business class passengers in 2024: a Delta One Business Class Lounge at JFK. After years of rumors, Delta confirmed it was building exclusive business class lounges in New York and Los Angeles earlier this year as part of a larger wish list for new Delta Sky Club construction.

More Atlanta additions, too

Don’t think Delta forgot its biggest hub airport.

Yes, of course, Delta is adding more transatlantic flights to and from its megahub in Atlanta (ATL). Including:

  • Atlanta to Stuttgart (STR) in Germany, with three flights per week from March 26
  • Atlanta to Dusseldorf (DUS) in Germanywith three flights per week from May 9
  • Atlanta to Edinburgh (EDI) Scotlanda summer seasonal route with five weekly flights from May 25

Edinburgh

All three routes are resuming operations after a long hiatus: Georgia-Germany flights were halted during the pandemic, while Delta has not flown nonstop from Atlanta to Edinburgh since 2007. New York to Edinburgh, however, did integral part of the Delta schedule.

All three routes are also currently scheduled to be operated by Delta’s obsolete Boeing 767-300s.

Conclusion

Delta is upping the ante on its flights to Europe for 2023.

Many of these routes are making long-awaited returns after being scrapped when the pandemic first hit, while others haven’t flown in a decade or two, if ever. But overall, it’s clear: transatlantic travel in 2023 will be even more important than last summer.

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A look at the three commercial airports on the Greek island of Crete https://windgefluester.net/a-look-at-the-three-commercial-airports-on-the-greek-island-of-crete/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/a-look-at-the-three-commercial-airports-on-the-greek-island-of-crete/ Located in the Mediterranean Sea to the southeast of the Greek mainland, the island of Crete is a popular destination among European vacationers. It is served by three commercial airports, with other existing facilities for general aviation and military purposes. Let’s take a closer look at which airports handle which flights. Heraklion Heraklion Nikos Kazantzakis […]]]>

Located in the Mediterranean Sea to the southeast of the Greek mainland, the island of Crete is a popular destination among European vacationers. It is served by three commercial airports, with other existing facilities for general aviation and military purposes. Let’s take a closer look at which airports handle which flights.


Heraklion

Heraklion Nikos Kazantzakis International Airport (HER) is located on the north coast of the island, close to the resort town of Malia. Not only is it the busiest air hub in Crete, but it also ranks second (behind Athens International Airport Eleftherios Venizelos) among Greek airports in terms of passenger traffic. In 2019, the last full calendar year of pre-coronavirus “normalcy”, it handled almost eight million passengers.

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The airport is a joint commercial/military facility, and its longest runway (09/27) spans 2,714 meters. This allows it to handle larger planes, like the Boeing 777 that Austrian Airlines deployed there amid huge demand last summer. However, for the most part its traffic consists of seasonal leisure and charter traffic operated by European narrow trains to meet summer holiday demand.

All the usual European suspects fly to Heraklion seasonally, ranging from low-cost carriers like easyJet, Ryanair and Wizz Air to full-service national carriers like Air France, British Airways and Finnair. Away from Europe, Etihad flies from Abu Dhabi on a seasonal basis. Some flights operate year-round, with most being domestic. However, Aegean also serves three German cities year-round.

LOT and TUI are among the many seasonal operators in Heraklion. Photo: Getty Images

The airline industry is always full of new things! What aviation news will you check next?

It should be noted that there are plans to replace Heraklion Airport by the middle of the current decade. These will see operations transferred to a modernized airport in Kasteli, which currently serves as a military base. This would mean, among other things, an extension that would take the Kastelis track to 3,800 meters in length. Heraklion airport will then be part of an urban regeneration project.

Chania

The second busiest commercial airport in Crete is Chania Daskalogiannis International (CHQ), in the northwest of the island. Before the coronavirus pandemic, this facility handled around three million passengers a year. Just like Heraklion, this airport is also shared, in terms of use, with the Hellenic Air Force.

Chania Airport operates similarly to its larger Cretan counterpart, with seasonal leisure and charter flights making up the bulk of its traffic. Year-round services primarily serve domestic destinations, namely Athens (Aegean Airlines, SkyExpress) and Thessaloniki (Ryanair). The only exception to this rule is the Cypriot destination of Paphos, to which Ryanair also flies year-round.

Military aircraft are commonplace in Chania. Photo: Getty Images

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Siteia

Located in the northeast of the island, the public airport of Sitia Vitsentzos Kornaros (JSH) operates on a much smaller scale. Indeed, even in 2018, its busiest pre-pandemic year, the facility still only handled around 62,000 passengers, with that figure having fallen to just over 11,000 in 2020. Its runway measures 2,074 meters long.

Due to the regional nature of Sitia’s operations, flights serving the airport do so year-round. Olympic Air offers a direct connection to Athens, while SkyExpress serves Alexandroupoli, Preveza/Lefkada and Zakynthos.

What do you think of Crete’s airports? How many have you visited? Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments!

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Our most impactful stories this week https://windgefluester.net/our-most-impactful-stories-this-week/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/our-most-impactful-stories-this-week/ Another week is coming to an end, which means it’s high time to take a look back at the top aviation news from the past seven days. Welcome to another iteration of Simple Flying’s “Sunday Reads” weekly digest! Etihad continues to review the Airbus A380 business case “very frequently” The question has often been asked […]]]>

Another week is coming to an end, which means it’s high time to take a look back at the top aviation news from the past seven days. Welcome to another iteration of Simple Flying’s “Sunday Reads” weekly digest!


Etihad continues to review the Airbus A380 business case “very frequently”

The question has often been asked – will Etihad bring the superjumbo back – and each time the answer is vague enough not to commit the airline one way or the other. Speaking to Simple Flying last year, CEO Tony Douglas said “never say never” when asked. This week we asked the airline again.

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Burying the hatchet: a new relationship between Emirates and United Airlines

This week, United Airlines and Emirates announced new partnerships at an event at Washington Dulles International Airport. This announcement is a significant change, as tensions between the United States and Gulf carriers were high just five years ago. You can read more about this historic agreement here.

Air Canada and SAS sign launch orders for new electric regional jets

Electric flight was once considered an impossibility, but it seems the day is approaching when airplanes powered by battery technology will become as acceptable as electric cars. This week, Heart Aerospace, a Swedish startup working on hybrid electric planes, got two big votes of confidence from major airlines.

The company has already registered letters of intent for 96 units. Photo: Heart Aerospace

Why Lufthansa isn’t interested in dimmable windows on the Airbus A350

Lufthansa‘s Airbus A350-900s are among its most modern aircraft and serve long-haul destinations worldwide. With the German national airline still expecting nearly 30 more such deliveries, it will be interesting to see how future deliveries differ from the first examples it received. However, one thing that will remain the same is its windows, as Lufthansa decided against using dimmable options.

Airbus is preparing to make its first delivery with such windows this year. Photo: Getty Images

Norse Atlantic has carried almost 100,000 passengers since its launch

Norse Atlantic revealed an average load factor of 75% between June and August and 69% in August. We shouldn’t read too much into a month’s result, especially for a new entrant, and we don’t yet know what passengers paid or how each route performed. In its first three months, it carried more than 96,000 passengers.

The airline filed 129,454 seats for sale between June and August. Photo: Northern Atlantic

Emirates and Lufthansa celebrate the return of Oktoberfest

After the pandemic shut down Munich’s annual Oktoberfest for two years, the world-famous beer festival is back. Lufthansa, which celebrated the festival even during its absence, is setting up its traditional celebration to accompany the festival. Emirates is also getting in on the act this year, with in-store treats for passengers traveling to its four German destinations. You can find out more here.

Oktoberfest will take place for the first time since 2019. Photo: Lufthansa

If you would like us to send you the best stories of the week in a weekly email newsletter, you can sign up for the mailing list here. See you next week!

What was your favorite story this week? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

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Famous German TV chef Johann Lafer spends time on the Istrian peninsula https://windgefluester.net/famous-german-tv-chef-johann-lafer-spends-time-on-the-istrian-peninsula/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:44:34 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/famous-german-tv-chef-johann-lafer-spends-time-on-the-istrian-peninsula/ September 17, 2022 – Celebrity German TV chef Johann Lafer has been spending time on the beautiful Istrian peninsula as he seeks to position himself as one of the most exciting foodie destinations in all of Europe. As Morski writes, one of the most prominent TV chefs in the entire German-speaking region, Johann Lafer, recently […]]]>

September 17, 2022 – Celebrity German TV chef Johann Lafer has been spending time on the beautiful Istrian peninsula as he seeks to position himself as one of the most exciting foodie destinations in all of Europe.

As Morski writes, one of the most prominent TV chefs in the entire German-speaking region, Johann Lafer, recently visited Istria. During his stay, an extensive editorial production of photos was carried out, which will be featured on no less than thirteen pages of the prestigious Lafer magazine this month.

At the end of July in Singapore, he created new menus for Singapore Airlines as one of the best airlines in the world, which German television company ARD reported to millions of people during an hour-long special during the prime-time evening program. In August, German TV chef Johann Lafer traveled to Istria to do some in-depth research on the region and its rich and varied food scene.

The star chef, who has received several Michelin stars among other things, is considered one of the most respected and highest paid chefs in all of Germany and Austria. His free visit to Istria was organized by Dr. Wolfgang Neuhuber of ART Redaktionsteam, a public relations agency, long-time partner of Istria, and the Istrian County Tourist Board.

”Johann Lafer is simply a passionate chef who takes great pleasure in cooking, wine and other quality products. Together with the director of the Istrian County Tourist Board, Denis Ivosevic, we tried to present all faces of the gastronomic destination of Istria,” Neuhuber said.

During the three-day research visit, Johann Lafer got acquainted with various Istrian specialties, from baking to classic food and wine, as well as typical Istrian delicacies. Of course there was no shortage of prosciutto, truffles and the well-known Istrian extra virgin olive oil.

Alongside German TV chief Johann Lafer, Patricia Brohm, longtime editor of the prestigious Gault Millau Germany guide, was present, as well as Hamburg’s top photographer, David Maupile, with Dr. Wolfgang Neuhuber as presenter. . Johann Lafer was delighted with what he discovered and has already booked his next private vacation in Croatia to “get to know this fascinating country even more”.

Most important and a huge success for Istrian tourism is the long cover story about Istria as a gastronomic destination, to be published in the autumn edition of the prestigious Lafer magazine . The magazine is owned by elite publisher Jahreszeiten-Verlag (Feinschmecker, Merian), and the advertising value of this free report for Istria is estimated to be around 230,000 euros, but it will bring invaluable value to the image of Istria and its destinations. .

To learn more, be sure to check out our dedicated travel section.

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Is Azul’s first Airbus A350 currently flying to Brazil? https://windgefluester.net/is-azuls-first-airbus-a350-currently-flying-to-brazil/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/is-azuls-first-airbus-a350-currently-flying-to-brazil/ An Airbus A350-900 currently flying to Brazil may be bound for Azul. The 5-year-old plane has been at the Tarbes Tarmac Aerosave facility since it left the Hong Kong Airlines fleet two and a half years ago. According to Airbus’ August order book, Azul has four A350-900s in its fleet, although none are yet flying […]]]>

An Airbus A350-900 currently flying to Brazil may be bound for Azul. The 5-year-old plane has been at the Tarbes Tarmac Aerosave facility since it left the Hong Kong Airlines fleet two and a half years ago. According to Airbus’ August order book, Azul has four A350-900s in its fleet, although none are yet flying for the Brazilian carrier.


It seems to be the season for airlines taking older planes. Late last month, Lufthansa took delivery of its first Boeing 787, a “brand new” three-year-old plane. Now Azul appears to be joining the crowd with its first used Airbus A350 en route to Brazil.

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

Fly to Brazil

At 11:38 a.m. local time, an Airbus A350-900 took off from Tabes Airport (LDE), an aircraft storage and storage facility in the south of France. According to data from FlightRadar24.com, the plane is bound for Belo Horizonte, Brazil’s sixth-largest city and a hub for Azul. At the time of writing, the plane was expected to arrive at its destination at 4:44 p.m., after approximately 10 hours of flying.

Interestingly, the aircraft’s transponder shows that it is flying as F-ZACG, which is associated with a Beechcraft 350. Despite the check-in, possibly due to an incorrectly set transponder, the flight number of the aircraft is given as FWTAO. This is the registration of one of the Airbus A350s scheduled to fly to Azul, according to data from ch-aviation.com.

Assuming this aircraft is F-WTAO, it is a 4.9 year old Airbus A350 which was originally delivered to Hong Kong Airlines on November 29, 2017. The airline operated the aircraft until November 7 February 2020, under registration B-LGC. Given that it has spent half its life in storage, the airline has a relatively low service time. It logged 9,463 flight hours over 1,602 cycles, which is equivalent to 1.08 years in the sky. Collateral Verications LLC estimates the aircraft is currently valued at $98.22 million, with a market lease rate of $750,000.

Data from FlightRadar24.com shows the plane visited Abu Dhabi in August, where Twitter user @KevenMartins777 spotted it in the Azul livery,

Azul and the Airbus A350

According to aeroTELEGRAPH, Azul decided to lease five Airbus A350s from International Lease Finance Corporation for international flights as deliveries began from 2017. In 2017, Brazil’s financial situation led to the decision not to fly . The German aerospace news site reported that the jets were sub-leased to carriers from the HNA Group, which declared bankruptcy last year.

Given the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on travel demand over the past two years, demand for aircraft has not been as strong as it always has been, with many aircraft being stored. These aircraft, along with Airbus A380s and other aircraft, were serviced at the Tarmac Aerosave in Tarbes, France.

What do you think of this flight? Let us know what you think and why in the comments below!

Sources: ch-aviation.com, FlightRadar24.com, aeroTELEGRAPH 1, aeroTELEGRAPH 2, aeroTELEGRAPH 3

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The story of the Zagreb air collision in 1976 https://windgefluester.net/the-story-of-the-zagreb-air-collision-in-1976/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/the-story-of-the-zagreb-air-collision-in-1976/ On this very day, September 10, 46 years ago in 1976, British Airways Flight 476 en route to Istanbul, Turkey from London collided mid-air with a Douglas DC-9 operated by Inex- Adria Aviopromet who was en route from Split to Cologne in what was then West Germany. In total, all 176 people on board the […]]]>

On this very day, September 10, 46 years ago in 1976, British Airways Flight 476 en route to Istanbul, Turkey from London collided mid-air with a Douglas DC-9 operated by Inex- Adria Aviopromet who was en route from Split to Cologne in what was then West Germany. In total, all 176 people on board the two planes were killed. At the time, it was the deadliest mid-air collision in the world and remains the worst air disaster in Croatian history.


The four-year-old British Airways Hawker Siddeley Trident aircraft, registration G-AWZT, was on a scheduled flight from London Heathrow Airport (LHR) to Istanbul-Yesilköy Airport (IST) in Turkey. The second aircraft involved in the incident was a two-year-old McDonnell Douglas DC-9-30 registered YU-AJR carrying German holidaymakers home after their holiday on the Dalmatian coast.

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

Both captains were experienced pilots

Captain Dennis Tann, 44, First Officer Brian Helm and Flight Engineer Martin Flin were responsible for British Airways Flight 476. The Inex-Adria Aviopromet McDonnell Douglas DC-9 was commanded by Jože Krumpak, 51, an experienced pilot with 10,157 flying hours, and first officer Dušan Ivanuš.

British Airways Flight 476 took off from London Heathrow Airport at 08:32 UTC with 54 passengers and nine crew. Inex-Adria flight 550 took off from Split airport at 09:48 UTC with 108 passengers and five crew members. Both flights were proceeding smoothly until they entered Zagreb airspace and came under the control of Zagreb’s Ait Traffic Control (ATC). The Zagreb VOR was a reporting point for many busy airways between northern and southeastern Europe and the Middle East

ATC Zagreb was one of the busiest ATC centers in the world

Although seriously understaffed and under-equipped by the mid-1970s, Zagreb’s ATC was one of the most active in the world. The airspace controlled by Zagreb ATC was divided into three sections:

  • Aircraft flying below 25,000 feet
  • Aircraft flying between 25,000 feet and 31,000 feet
  • Aircraft flying above 31,000 feet

After crossing the Austrian border into what was then Yugoslavia, BA Flight 476 established radio contact with Zagreb ATC, speaking with senior control sector controller Gradimir Tasić. At 10:42 UTC, BA476 radioed to say it was sailing at 33,000 feet and should reach the Zagreb VOR at 10:14 a.m. The controller told BA flight to select transponder code 2312 and call again when they reached the VOR.

It turned out to be the last communication with the plane.

At the same time as the BA flight was talking to the upper level controller, the DC-9 commander contacted the middle level controller, Bojan Erjavecto, requesting clearance for an upper level flight. At the time, the plane was cruising at 26,000 feet. Both flight levels, 28,000 feet and 31,000 feet, were occupied by other aircraft leaving only 35,000 feet available, which Captain Krumpak accepted.

To climb to the highest altitude, it was necessary to obtain the authorization of the ATC controller in charge of the higher level. Erjavec waved his hand to get Tasić’s attention, but the upper level controller was too busy to notice. Eventually things were sorted out and the DC-9 was cleared to ascend to a higher level.

Suddenly realizing there was a danger of collision between the DC-9 and the Trident, Tasić ordered the DC-9 to stop climbing and, in a panic, reverted to his native Serbo-Croatian language rather than using English, as was the procedure. Because of this, the British Airways captain would have had no idea what was being said, and no idea of ​​the imminent danger his flight was in. By the time JP550 leveled off it was at 33,000 feet, just like the British flight. Airline planes.

The two planes collided at 10:14 a.m., and 30 seconds later Tasić attempted to call BA476 and asked them to report passing the next waypoint at Našice. The call went unanswered.

The captain of a Lufthansa 737 witnessed the collision

Meanwhile, a Lufthansa Boeing 737 flying east at 29,000ft 15 miles behind the Trident saw what it thought was a lightning strike and then two planes plummeting to the ground. The Lufthansa captain immediately reported what he witnessed to the mid-level ATC controller. The two planes had collided near the town of Vrbovec, northeast of Zagreb, killing all passengers and crew.

All serving ATC controllers were taken by police for questioning and then released, except for Tasić, who remained in custody until trial. At the end of the trial, Tasić was the only one to be found guilty and was sentenced to seven years in prison. ATC controllers across Yugoslavia petitioned on his behalf, claiming he had become a scapegoat. On November 28, 1978, he was released from prison after serving two years and three months in prison.

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Maxi Kleber signs three-year contract extension with Mavericks https://windgefluester.net/maxi-kleber-signs-three-year-contract-extension-with-mavericks/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:40:00 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/maxi-kleber-signs-three-year-contract-extension-with-mavericks/ By Johnny Askounis/ info@eurohoops.net Maxi Kleber is about to sign a new contract and extend his stay in Dallas. Kleber, 30, completes a three-year, $33 million contract extension with the Dallas Mavericks, by Athletic’s Shams Charania. Added to the current contract, the new contract comes into effect after the next season and is expected to […]]]>

By Johnny Askounis/ info@eurohoops.net

Maxi Kleber is about to sign a new contract and extend his stay in Dallas.

Kleber, 30, completes a three-year, $33 million contract extension with the Dallas Mavericks, by Athletic’s Shams Charania. Added to the current contract, the new contract comes into effect after the next season and is expected to last until the 2025-26 season.

In the 2017-18 season, he landed in Dallas and the NBA. After a few campaigns at FC Bayern Munich, including 21 Turkish Airlines EuroLeague appearances, the German striker has played 357 NBA games, including 31 in the past three playoffs. Previous teams were Rio Natura Monbus Obradoiro and s.Oliver Wurzburg. He was not drafted in 2014, before moving from the German club to the Spanish club.

In the last and fifth NBA campaign, Kleber had 7.4 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.1 assists, 0.9 blocks and 0.4 steals per game in 77 appearances. Career averages of 7.1 points, 4.8 rebounds, 1.1 assists, 0.9 blocks, and 0.4 steals per game paint the overall picture of his NBA career.

He is among Germany’s notable absences from EuroBasket 2022. Despite the absence of Kleber, Moe Wagner and Isaac Bonga, Germany secured the second seed in Group B of the preliminary round and will face Montenegro in round of 16 on Saturday. The knockout stage of the tournament will take place in Berlin and will end on October 18.

Kleber was born in the same town as the team legend and currently supports the franchise as special advisor Dirk Nowitzki. Würzburg has been a special city for the Mavs.

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German carrier Lufthansa avoids another strike as pilots reach pay deal https://windgefluester.net/german-carrier-lufthansa-avoids-another-strike-as-pilots-reach-pay-deal/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 18:58:45 +0000 https://windgefluester.net/german-carrier-lufthansa-avoids-another-strike-as-pilots-reach-pay-deal/ The union representing Lufthansa pilots is calling off a planned two-day strike after a last-minute settlement with Germany’s biggest airline in a pay dispute. With inflation soaring, collective wage negotiations are expected to be tense in the coming months across Europe. (Andre Pain / AFP) Pilots at German airline Lufthansa have called off a planned […]]]>

The union representing Lufthansa pilots is calling off a planned two-day strike after a last-minute settlement with Germany’s biggest airline in a pay dispute.

With inflation soaring, collective wage negotiations are expected to be tense in the coming months across Europe. (Andre Pain / AFP)

Pilots at German airline Lufthansa have called off a planned strike later this week following a last-minute settlement in pay talks with the carrier, their union Cockpit said.

The pilots of the passenger and cargo planes were due to start their strike from Wednesday, but “an agreement has been reached”, a Cockpit spokesman said on Tuesday, adding that the walkout “would therefore be cancelled”.

Just hours ago pilots said they would depart from Wednesday to Thursday, while the industrial action for those operating cargo flights would last one more day until Friday.

Faced with the threat of further chaos, Lufthansa management immediately said it would present a “better offer” to the union in urgent talks later today.

The airline was forced to cancel nearly all of its flights on Friday due to a one-day pilot strike, affecting 130,000 passengers.

No details have yet been provided on the pay deal and Lufthansa declined to comment.

READ MORE: Over a thousand flights canceled as Lufthansa staff go on strike

Union demands

The pilots’ union is calling for a 5.5% wage increase by the end of the year, automatic compensation for inflation and adjustments to its salary grid.

Lufthansa said the entire package sought by Cockpit would increase pilot personnel costs by 40% or $900 million.

With inflation soaring, collective wage negotiations are expected to be tense in the coming months across Europe.

The IG Metall union called for a demonstration on Saturday to launch collective wage bargaining for the metal and electrical industry.

Its “Mitte” chapter, which represents workers in the regions of Hesse, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarland and Thuringia, said it would demand 8% more wages for 12 months for the 400,000 workers it represents.

German consumer prices rose 7.9% on the year to August, according to data released last week by the federal statistics agency Destatis.

READ MORE: Hundreds of flights canceled in Germany as Lufthansa pilots go on strike

Source: TRTWorld and agencies

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